How asphalt preservation works

Asphalt Preservation is an economical option for maintaining roads in good to reasonable condition. The treatment involves the spray application of tough abrasion resistant natural bitumen binder onto a suitable road surface, typically one to two years before reactive maintenance becomes necessary – determined from local knowledge of surface course life.

The spray applied preservative…

  • SEALS MICRO-CRACKS IN THE AGED ASPHALT SURFACE AND REDUCES INGRESS OF WATER, SALTS AND CONTAMINANTS (FEWER POTHOLES, ETC)
  • IMPROVES WEAR RESISTANCE AND REDUCES BINDER OXIDATION SO LONGER LIFE
  • IS A LOW TEMPERATURE SPRAY APPLIED PENETRATIVE SURFACE TREATMENT
  • IS VERY FLEXIBLE IN TERMS OF ITS DELIVERY SO CAN BE USED TO TREAT SMALL DIFFICULT AREAS INCLUDING ROUNDABOUTS, ESTATE ROADS, FOOTPATHS, TUNNELS ETC
  • HAS IN EXCESS OF 80% CARBON SAVINGS COMPARED TO ASPHALT RESURFACING
  • IT CAN ALSO TREAT SURFACE DRESSINGS AND MICRO-SURFACINGS
  • RHINOPHALT® IS CE MARKED AND BBA HAPAS CERTIFICATION FOLLOWING PRODUCT ASSESSMENT ON THE M40 – THE 2ND MOST HEAVILY TRAFFICKED MOTORWAY IN THE UK
  • RHINOPHALT HAS DEMONSTRATED PROVEN PERFORMANCE OVER 20 YEARS AND HAS BEEN USED IN UK AND AROUND THE WORLD FOR MAINTAINING VARIOUS INFRASTRUCTURE ASSETS INCLUDING AIRPORTS, BRIDGES, TEST TRACKS AND DBFO ROAD SCHEMES

The spray application results in a very hard wearing hydrophobic barrier membrane that seals the road surface. It penetrates several millimetres into the asphalt surface effectively grouting micro-cracks and sealing interconnecting voids to provide a strong key, giving a durable seal to prevent water ingress and slow down further oxidization due to weathering and UV degradation.

It preserves the condition of the asphalt binder at the point of treatment and provides improved cohesion and binding properties with the aggregate matrix.

The solution is best utilised as a preventative maintenance measure as part of a long term asset management strategy, extending the operational life of the pavement and delaying the large costs of resurfacing and repair works.

Asphalt Preservation protects the asphalt from water ingress.

Asphalt Preservation protects the asphalt from water ingress.

PRESERVATION HELPS COMPLIANCE

Delivery of a safe and well maintained highway network relies on good evidence and sound engineering judgement. The UK Roads Liaison Group produced the Well-Managed Highway Infrastructure: A Code Of Practice with the intention that Authorities will develop their own levels of service and the Code therefore provides guidance for authorities to consider when developing their approach in accordance with local needs, priorities and affordability

The following recommendations from the Code are of particular relevance to the benefits of asphalt preservation and how it assists authorities to be compliant with the Code.

RECOMMENDATION 13 – WHOLE LIFE / DESIGNING FOR MAINTENANCE

Authorities should take whole life costs into consideration when assessing options for maintenance, new and improved highway schemes. The future maintenance costs of such new infrastructure are therefore a prime consideration.

RECOMMENDATION 20 – RESILIENT NETWORK

Within the highway network hierarchy, a ‘Resilient Network’ should be identified to which priority is given through maintenance and other measures to maintain economic activity and access to key services during extreme weather.

RECOMMENDATION 29 – LIFECYCLE PLANS

Lifecycle planning principles should be used to review the level of funding, support investment decisions and substantiate the need for appropriate and sustainable long term investment. (HIAMG Recommendation 6)

RECOMMENDATION 32 – CARBON

The impact of highway infrastructure maintenance activities in terms of whole life carbon costs should be taken into account when determining appropriate interventions, materials and treatments.

RECOMMENDATION 35 – ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT, NATURE CONSERVATION AND BIODIVERSITY

Materials, products and treatments for highway infrastructure maintenance should be appraised for environmental impact and for wider issues of sustainability. Highway verges, trees and landscaped areas should be managed with regard to their nature conservation value and biodiversity principles as well as whole-life costing, highway safety and serviceability.

A.1.1.8. All Highway Authorities should consider the adoption of new and emerging technologies as part of their highway service. This should include consideration of new ideas, methods of working and innovation in order to drive greater efficiency.